Safety Page

BICYCLE HELMET SAFETY

A Properly Fitted Helmet Is Essential To Safe Bicycling:
1. Try the helmet on before you buy it
2. Adjust the chin strap firmly but comfortably
3. Try another helmet size or design if simple hand pressure shifts or tilts a helmet significantly on your head, or forces it off your head – it should not rock from front to back or side to side
Read and Follow All Directions Carefully:
1. Replace your helmet immediately if it has been damaged
2. Replace your helmet at least every five years
3. Only use manufacturer approved decorations and cleaners
Wear Your Helmet Correctly:
1. Wear it every time and everywhere you ride
2. Wear it low on your forehead just above the eyebrows
3. The helmet straps must always be buckled/fastened
To Make Sure the Helmet is Strapped Correctly:
1. Pull it forward from back to front. If it hits the bridge of the nose, it’s too loose
2. Push it from front to back. If the forehead shows, it’s too loose
3. Adjust the “V” strap surrounding the ear. The “V” of the strap should come just below the earlobe

COMBINE SAFETY EQUIPMENT WITH CAREFUL RIDING FOR A SAFE TRIP HOME!

(The foregoing information has been provided by the local chapter of the National SAFE KIDS Campaign)    

BURGLARY ALERT

Don’t let thieves do their shopping at your house!

Always keep your doors and windows locked even if you will only be gone for a short time.  Exterior doors should have minimum one-inch deadbolt locks.

Never leave a house key under a doormat, in a flower pot or on a ledge. Burglars know where to look.

If you have recently moved or if someone has moved out of your house, change all the locks. Be selective when giving keys to others.

Be generous with outdoor lighting. Both indoor and outdoor lighting that is light-activated makes it more difficult for the burglar to know it is automatic. Radios turned on to “talk show” stations may
give a burglar cause to think someone is in the house and may be a deterrent.

Mark all valuables with your California driver’s license number. If articles cannot be marked, photograph or videotape them. These measures make it easier to identify the stolen items and return them to you when they are recovered. It will also provide an inventory for the insurance company.

If you leave for the holidays, make your residence appear occupied. Set timers for televisions and radios using a varied schedule.

Have a trustworthy neighbor, relative or friend pickup your mail and newspapers everyday. Also have them change drapery or shade positions from time to time.

If you are home and see a suspicious person, car or activity, trust your instincts and call 911. Also ask the person who is watching your house while you are gone to do the same.

Be aware of your surroundings and stay alert to people around you.

Lock your car and close your windows even if you’ll only be gone for a few minutes.  Place packages in the trunk.

When waiting for public transportation or rides from friends, do so in a busy, well-lighted place.

Avoid carrying large amounts of cash.  Use checks or credit cards to pay for puchases whenever possible.

If your credit cards are lost, stolen, or misued, notify the issuers immediately.  Carry only those cards you will need.  Record account numbers and keep in a safe and separate place.

Purses and wallets become tagets for crime in crowded shopping areas, bus stops, and on public transportation.  Consider using a fanny-pack to hold money, keys, and a credit card.

Don’t overload yourself with packages and bags.  Make frequent trips to your car.

When driving home, and especially before entering your garage or carport, be aware of vehicles that may be following you.

      Home Invasion Alert

In an effort to assist residents in preventing home invasion, CRIME STOPPERS OF MONTEREY COUNTY offers the following suggestions for your safety.

KEEP ALL DOORS LOCKED (both day and night).
KEEP ALL WINDOWS CLOSED AND LOCKED even in the summer. Keeping the shades drawn during the day reduces the heat even at night. In the winter drawn shades or drapes will keep the heat in. Both are energy savers as well.
KEEP OUTSIDE LIGHTS ON AT NIGHT. An electric-eye light sensor automatically turns floodlamps on at darkness – off at daylight. A motion sensor light alerts you to movement and is also helpful as a deterrent.
PEEPHOLES IN THE DOOR MUST BE LOW ENOUGH FOR EVERYONE IN THE FAMILY TO REACH WITHOUT GETTING A STOOL. This may mean having 2 or 3 peepholes — one for the shortest adult and one for the shortest child. You can always bend over or kneel to the lower one…you cannot get a stool each time.
ASK FRIENDS, RELATIVES AND NEIGHBORS TO TELEPHONE BEFORE THEY COME TO YOUR HOME. You will then be expecting them. A safe peek at the peephole will verify their arrival.
DO NOT MOVE CURTAINS OR SHADES TO SEE OUTSIDE. Use the peephole so outsiders cannot see the movement and know you are home.
DO NOT OPEN THE DOOR UNTIL YOU HAVE IDENTIFIED THE VISITOR THROUGH THE PEEPHOLE — even if it is a female!
DO NOT OPEN THE DOOR UNLESS YOU ARE EXPECTING THE IDENTIFIED VISITOR. If you identify the person by using the peephole you can then talk through the door.
IF THE PERSON OR PERSONS ARE SUSPICIOUS IN APPEARANCE OR IN ACTIONS, CALL 911. Get descriptions of the person, vehicle and license plate number if you can do so without risking your safety!
KEEP A PHONE AVAILABLE IN ALL BEDROOMS AND BATHS. A phone with a long cord can be taken into the bedrooms at night or the bathrooms during showers and baths. Outsiders only have to listen at the bathroom window to know someone is using the facilities. That may offer them an entrance opportunity.
DO NOT DISCUSS FINANCIAL MATTERS WITH FRIENDS, RELATIVES OR NEIGHBORS. They may unintentionally mention this information to their acquaintances who may want your hard earned money.
TEACH YOUR CHILDREN NOT TO DISCUSS YOUR BUSINESS OR PERSONAL FINANCES WITH ANYONE. It may be repeated to a potential home invader.
DO NOT INVITE PERSONS TO VIEW THE INTERIOR OF YOUR HOUSE. That gives an opportunity to assess your possibly valuable possessions and the layout of your house.
DO NOT LEAVE MORE MONEY THAN NECESSARY AT HOME. Use a bank — it’s harder to break into than your house!
KEEPING A DOG IN THE BACK YARD IS A GOOD METHOD OF DETERRING HOME-INVADERS ENTERING YOUR HOME FROM THE REAR. Keeping a dog is also a good way to teach children a sense of responsibility. Studies have shown that the health of older adults who live alone is improved when they have a pet as a companion.

 

If you have any questions or would like copies of these helpful hints, please feel free to call

831-449-5355  –  FAX your request to 831-449-5358  or e-mail:  gmdial@aol.com

STOP CRIME IN THE COMMUNITY SAFELY!

CALL 1-800-499-CRIME

                           

Traveler’s Safety Tips

As a public service, CRIME STOPPERS OF MONTEREY COUNTY OFFERS THESE SAFETY TIPS FOR TRAVELERS. EXTRA PRECAUTIONS SHOULD BE TAKEN WHEN TRAVELING:

Before leaving home choose a wardrobe (T-shirt, jacket, etc) that provides all members of the group with the same colors each day (Mon.-blue, Tue.-red, etc.) It makes visible location easier.

Do not depend on local souvenir clothing–too many people will be wearing them.

Use small combination locks for luggage, making sure it is clearly marked inside and out.

Perform a thorough vehicle maintenance check.

Obtain maps and information from Chambers of Commerce along the travel route.

Close the door securely when you enter or leave your room. Use all of the locking devices provided when in the room.

Check to see that any sliding glass doors or windows and any connecting room doors are locked.

Always use the peephole in your room door!!–to verify who is there. If a person claims to be an employee, call the front desk and ask if someone on their staff is supposed to have access to your room and for what purpose.

Make the locally used emergency number (e.g. 911) known to all members of your group.

Do not invite strangers to your room! If you meet someone, invite them to a public room in the hotel or the office of a motel without giving them your room number.

Car Jacking

Although Monterey County has not experienced crime wave proportions of car-jackings, there have been several incidents. There has been an increase in car-jackings in most areas of the county. Many involve violent injury and deaths have occurred.

The incidence of car-jacking has risen to a large degree as a result of more sophisticated anti-theft devices installed in vehicles. Detective R. Birdsall of the Long Beach Police Department says “a car-jacking can happen within 15 to 30 seconds while the theft of a parked car can be thwarted by an anti-theft device, causing a thief to spend several minutes to overcome the device.

All vehicles are targets, not just expensive models. Nor are the majority of victims women. To the contrary, about 80% of car-jacking victims are males.

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